$8 in advance/$10 at the door

10:30pm doors/11pm showtime

21+

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corey Palmer & LOVETRADE:

Corey Palmer is a Minnesota-based singer/songwriter/ producer known primarily for his time fronting These Modern Socks and Daykit. After taking an indefinite hiatus from music to raise a family, Corey was jolted back into music making after a near-fatal car accident in 2014 abruptly re-prioritized his life’s intentions. He subsequently began writing and recording new material by himself, and eventually released his solo debut, the Love Trade EP. That collection’s potent recipe of indelible melodies, beat-centric production, and unfeigned lyricism was warmly embraced by his patient fan base. Corey continued to explore a similar musical vein on his new release, This Could Be About Anyone, while also sewing in numerous layers of analog synths, falsetto harmonies, and afrobeat percussion. 

Corey then returned to live performance accompanied by 6 of his close friends, who also happen to be very accomplished musicians in their own rite: Adrian Suarez (Adam Meckler Orchestra, Vicious Vicious), Nick Tveitbakk (These Modern Socks, Pachyderm Studios), Jeff Marcovis (Al Church, Tyte Jeff), Park Evans (Fireball, Enormous Quartet), Katie Marshall (Parts for All Makes, Katie Marshall Three-O), and Scott McVeigh (Mark Mallman, Speed’s The Name).  

In early 2016, a serious bout with depression found Corey holed up at his home studio, writing and recording about his spiral.  The end result is a sprawling 24-minute --and ironically ambitious-- pop song that seamlessly hops around genres and scarily projects Palmer's manic head-space throughout. "Heartache" is a lyrical and aural narration that is the product of a near-7-month battle against a mental illness that was he was not supposed to win, yet he came out of this war alive, optimistic, and ready to help guide other like-minded sufferers.  

 

 

 

 

 

PETER WOLF CRIER:

It is not so much a sound as a spirit. You don't need to name it to know it or to trust it. Peter Wolf Crier's second album Garden of Arms is a document that paints a vivid portrait of all the pain and beauty of growth. Written with the at-home repose demanded by performing a hundred shows in six months, these eleven tracks were nurtured from their hushed origins with a new-found footing of confidence and experimentation. Adapting the tenets of the grinding live show, the duo of Peter Pisano and Brian Moen transformed the fuzzy distortion, rolling and crashing drums, and laser-focused purposefulness into an intensely dynamic yet supremely polished album. 

The lead off track, "Right Away", best exemplifies the band's new direction, a dense and jarring embrace of the immediacy of real personal connection. Later on in the album, restraint is more readily apparent, in tracks like "Settling it Off", where the sonics do not threaten to overwhelm but are instead peeled back to reveal a more subdued, secure sense of direction. 

The notion that any one of these songs could be your favorite depending on where your head and heart reside, moment to moment, is the most appealing aspect of this album. Throughout Garden of Arms, swagger is juxtaposed against an icy delicacy, making the scope of the record complex but somehow an easily digestible statement of how Peter Wolf Crier are rolling: a wheel, rusted with unrestrained hope. 

It is apparent from listening to the album that, for Pisano and Moen, 2010 was a both an absolutely exhilarating and a profoundly exhausting year. How they so evocatively and effectively channeled the fabric of their experiences into their body of work is not something they could do two years ago. This is a band that is just starting to figure out what they are capable of.