$8 IN ADVANCE/$10 AT THE DOOR

9PM DOORS/10PM SHOWTIME

21+

 

 

 

 

DUSTY HEART:

Rich vocal harmonies merge with intimate layers of guitar, fiddle and banjo to define the lush sound of Dusty Heart.  Brought together through a shared wanderlust and love for musical harmony, the powerhouse duo has crafted a dynamic and haunting sound rooted in the vast landscape of the American Heartland that bridges together the diverse musical worlds of roots, indie, and folk.

 

 

 

 

 

BBGUN:

BBGUN began in a sunny living room, over coffee, on a Friday morning that quickly turned into every Friday morning. Musicians and songwriters Al Church and Neal Perbix's distinct styles, matured over years of Minneapolis gigs, wove to form lyrics that are both contemplative and playful and harmonies both sophisticated and singable. Complemented by Jeremy Hanson's expert, easy drumming, their rock 'n' roll tunes sound best blasted from the speakers of a pickup truck. BBGUN's solid debut album documents the anxiety and surprising joys of trading in late-night cigarettes for a kind of settling down.

 

 

 

 

 

Dem Yuut:

The legendary director Mike Nichols believed any worthwhile scene could be boiled down toone of three things: a negotiation, a seduction, or a fight. On the full-length debut, Liberator,from Minneapolis quartet DEM YUUT, that trinity plays out in a uniquely disarming fashion.The album’s nine songs play directly to those fundamental human pursuits, rinsing the sweatyimpulse of modern R&B in astute waves of synth and indie atmosphere. Even when frontmanDanny O’Brien is in a reflective and delicate mode, there’s an earnest sense of swagger to cutthrough the lovelorn haze. Lead-off track “Dawn/Sea” toys with Top 40 tropes without shortingtheir impact, while “Muck” puts a coolly calculated spin on the troubled relationship jam.Rounded out by bandmates Don House, Jeremy Hanson and Jef Sundquist, DEM YUUT pushesbeyond the common confines of laptop R&B with a gorgeous array of sounds and textures —some improvised live in the studio, others meticulously crafted. But while the aesthetics rundeep, the songs are as well-suited to the jeep as any Drake or Kanye cut. Even the headycinematic tension in tracks like “Bloody Knuckles” and “Worse Off” is offset by an ear forhypnotic boom-bap.In total, the album is an expertly stitched soundtrack to a few universal pastimes of summer:the fevered crush, the drunk confession, the slow drive, the blissful giving in to what simplyfeels right at the time.